A Sudanese Reaction to OSJI’s Torture Report

The Open Society Justice Initiative (OSJI) recently released a report (.pdf) entitled, “Globalizing Torture: CIA Secret Detention and Extraordinary Rendition.” The report includes sections on numerous countries whose governments reportedly participated in detention and rendition. Readers of this blog may be interested to look at the sections on Algeria (p. 65), Djibouti (pp. 73-74), Ethiopia (pp. 75-76), Gambia (p. 77), Kenya (p. 88), Libya (pp. 88-90), Mauritania (p. 96), Morocco (pp. 97-98), and Somalia (pp. 106-107). At the Washington Post, Max Fisher has created what he calls “a staggering map of the 54 countries that reportedly participated in the CIA’s rendition program.”

The report has no stand-alone section on Sudan, but the report refers to Sudan several times as a site where people were transferred.

I have been interested for some time in the issue of what “leverage” the United States government has over the Sudanese government, and whether Khartoum has grown pessimistic about its chances of normalizing relations with Washington. In light of this concern, I was interested to read the Sudan Tribune‘s article on the OSJI report. The Paris-based Sudan Tribune is not a government-run publication and sometimes takes an oppositional tone toward the government, but I would not be surprised if some officials in Khartoum share the paper’s sense of what it calls the “irony” of Sudan’s cooperation on renditions:

“It is true that there was a period of time, as in 2002, 2003 and 2004, when intelligence cooperation with NISS went up but that has to be put in context … It is relative as it [counterterrorism ties] went from nothing to something,” [a US] official told Sudan Tribune last month.

He said that the US intelligence cooperation with Sudan is nowhere near the one that exists with Jordan, for example.

Ironically Sudan has been on the US blacklist of states sponsoring terrorism since 1993 over allegations it harboured Islamist militants.

Sudan has also been subject to comprehensive economic sanctions since 1997 over terrorism charges as well as human right abuses. Further sanctions, particularly on weapons, were imposed in 2003 following the outbreak of violence in the western Darfur region.

Have you read any other reactions to the OSJI report from around the region?

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2 thoughts on “A Sudanese Reaction to OSJI’s Torture Report

  1. Would suggest that many, many countries are in a state of shock — either from being exposed to their citizens not knowing of the involvement of their country.

    A quickie look thru Google search engine showed these:
    CIA rendition report author believes UK, Pakistan could face human rights court
    Posted on 2013-02-06 14:59:33
    LONDON (INP): Up to two dozen European countries including the UK could face proceedings before the European Court of Human Rights from their involvement in the CIA’s extraordinary rendition operations after 9/11, according to a human rights organization that has documented worldwide secret support for the program.

    http://www.thefrontierpost.com/news/17582/

    CIA rendition report author believes UK could face human rights court
    Up to two dozen European countries including the UK could face proceedings before the European Court of Human Rights from their involvement in the CIA’s extraordinary rendition operations after 9/11, according to a human rights organization that has documented worldwide secret support for the program.

    http://www.democraticunderground.com/1014392005

    Report on CIA rendition reveals massive scale of European assistance

    http://xenophilius.wordpress.com/2013/02/05/report-on-cia-rendition-reveals-massive-scale-of-european-assistance/

    Report on CIA rendition reveals massive scale of European assistance
    Open Society research assembles long roster of nations willing to help the Bush administration with extra-legal program
    Last paragraph of article: Bush warned that he was keeping track of countries that did not cooperate with the US “war on terror.” “Over time it’s going to be important for nations to know they will be held accountable for inactivity,” he said. The Open Society report is a step toward holding nations accountable for their activity, too.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/05/cia-rendition-help-european-leaders

    The Guardian notes that Israel is among countries “conspicuous by their absence from the rendition list.”

    http://jurist.org/paperchase/2013/02/index_2013_02_06.php

    http://watchingthelaw.blogspot.com/2013/02/rendition-and-torture-report-implicates.html

    http://www.salon.com/2013/02/05/report_54_countries_supported_cia_rendition/

    The Guardian commented Tuesday that the publication of the OSJI report, titled “Globalizing Torture,” “appears to have been timed to coincide with the confirmation hearing on Thursday of John Brennan, Barack Obama’s choice to head the CIA. Brennan is widely expected to be questioned about his association with the so-called enhanced interrogation policies adopted by Bush.” As noted earlier Tuesday, Brennan’s hearing this week also coincides with the leak of a Justice Department memo noting the controversial and vague legal justifications that appear to go behind the Obama administration’s targeted killing program — an issue about which Brennan will also likely be questioned.

    http://www.irishexaminer.com/archives/2013/0206/world/ireland-offered-aposcovert-supportapos-to-cia-renditions-221803.html

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