Writings/Podcast/Event on Nigeria’s Elections

Nigeria will hold elections on March 28 and April 11. I’ve done a few things recently on the elections and related topics. I will appear on a panel at the Wilson Center on Wednesday, February 11 to discuss the state of play, including the recent postponement. Here are links to some recent writings and a podcast:

  • Background to Nigeria’s 2015 Elections” (.pdf). This paper, written for the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), gives an overview of the processes, parties, and candidates. It also takes a look at some state-level developments and contests. The paper’s purpose is to offer the non-specialist an informational introduction. More subtly, the paper seeks to remind readers that there is more to this election than just Boko Haram.
  • Don’t Ignore Nigeria’s Gubernatorial Elections.” This blog post at the Washington Post‘s Monkey Cage builds on the CSIS report by calling attention to some of the dynamics that receive little attention in the U.S., but that will have major consequences for many Nigerians’ lives – namely, the outcomes of gubernatorial elections. Again, this piece highlights developments beyond Boko Haram, specifically by examining governors’ races in Lagos, Kano, and Rivers.
  • The Logic Behind Boko Haram’s Brutal Attacks.” This briefing for World Politics Review argues that there is a logic behind Boko Haram’s violence against civilians in northeastern Nigeria, and that Boko Haram’s attacks are only partly related to the elections – in other words, I expect Boko Haram to trouble Nigeria for some time to come, no matter who wins.
  • Boko Haram and the Nigerian Elections.” This podcast with UN Dispatch explores some of the ways in which Boko Haram’s violence is intersecting with the campaign.

If you read or listen to any of these pieces, I welcome your thoughts in the comments.

2 thoughts on “Writings/Podcast/Event on Nigeria’s Elections

  1. I enjoyed your Washington Post article. I would be interested to hear more about Tinubu’s tax collection and delivery of services” policy in Lagos. Also, it seems like the shari’ah polices being carried out in Kano are mostly women/gender segregation related. Is this the case?

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